The Day Dawn Patriotic Knitting Club

In October 1915, during WWI, it was suggested by the Karrakatta Club in Perth that they adopt a Melbourne club’s idea and organise to send Christmas cheer to the soldiers overseas. They decided to utilise billies and aimed to include in them “something to eat, something to smoke, something to use and something to amuse.” Despite their limited time, the scheme was successful and very popular with the soldiers. They decided to continue it in the following year.

Distributing Christmas billies to the soldiers in Egypt circa 1915.

The idea of the Christmas billies reached the women living at Day Dawn, a small town several kilometres southwest of Cue. A few women had donated billies in 1915, but in early July 1916, a group of women decided to contribute on a larger scale. Along with fundraising for goods to place in the billies, the women started knitting. However, seeing as though there were some women and children who did not know how to knit, Mrs Mary Threadgold decided to establish the Day Dawn Patriotic Knitting Club.

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Peace! Peace! Peace!

An extract from The Daily News (12 November 1918; Page 6) describing the scenes in Perth as the armistice and the end of the war was announced to an awaiting crowd.


In the City

Throughout the day the people had waited for its coming; waited with ever-growing expectancy. A few minutes after 6 p.m. the first message, received from Washington, via Montreal, was posted in front of “The Daily News” office. It was not official; but the crowd quickly began to gather, though the flood gates of joy were not then thrown ajar. A second message came an hour or more later – official from Vancouver. Still the crowd, now quickly swelling, refused to let go. But they were ready for any lead. A Salvation Army officer gave it. Climbing aloft, he called, “Are we downhearted?” The thunderous roar of the answering “No, No, No,” was followed by the cry, “Then sing ‘God Save the King.’” How it was sung!

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